Category Archives: Work and Travel

Tips for those who want to go to Australia

Some folks were asking about my working holiday experience in Australia. Although I’ve written a few articles about the working holiday visa itself, I thought I’d put together some advice for those who are thinking about it but still unsure.

This is a rather lengthy article and is divided into three parts: getting around, money, and living in Australia. It’s all garnered from my own experience so take it for what it’s worth.

Before you go

Australia is very similar to North America and Western Europe in that it is a developed country with first world health care and, surprise surprise, people who walk and talk English, albeit in a slightly different accent than what the rest of the world is used to. That being the case, it’s similar to North America especially if you in the trades or have no problem going anywhere to work. There is a lot of money to be made, but you’ll also be spending a lot, too. Natural landscapes, red dirt that somehow yields grain crops, gorgeous women on world class beaches, skin cancer (thanks to the massive whole in the ozone layer above the continent) and a nightly display of the Milky Way are all things that make Australia a unique place to visit, work and live.

Visa. Unless you’re hopping a boat from Indonesia and want to claim asylum on the continent, you’ll need a proper working holiday visa to work in Australia. The current cost is around $400 and takes about three weeks to process. In order to qualify for the visa you’ll have to prove that you’re not on any police wanted lists, have sufficient means to get your ass out of the country if you fail at getting a job, and that you’re not from any country on the banned list. I’ve written a bit about the working holiday visa scheme, so take a look here, here and here for more info.

Budget. You will hear that Australia is expensive and that you need a lot of money simply to get going. It’s true that flights can be expensive (and very, very long), but soon you’ll see that the minimum wage of Australia is much higher than your home country. To put this into perspective, in Canada, the minimum wage is around $11/hr while a pint of the cheaper beer is around $5. Minimum wage in Europe is around 9 Euros/hr, but you can buy a beer for 1 or 2 Euros. Sandwiches, the blessing of some innovative individual, bought from the store will run you about $8 in Australia, Canada, maybe $5 or $6, Europe, $3 or $4. So, you see, the cost is relative.

The thing to watch out for is what you’re spending your money on. When you visit a new country you’re excited to try all the new things at least four times before deciding you don’t like it or don’t need it. Food (including coffee and beer because, let’s face it, you’re going to be socializing a lot) will remain a constant and depending on your health needs, your budget will fluctuate. So, if you’re buying food from restaurants and cafes, etc., expect to budget about $30-40 a day. However, if you’re making your own food and buying groceries at the supermarket, you can budget about $100 for the WEEK, and that’d include meat, dairy, poultry, vegetables, fruits, etc. Many hostels will provide a free breakfast, but keep your expectations low and you will be more pleasantly surprised.

Getting Around

***The following three paragraphs about transportation in Australia is very similar to my post on travelling across Canada on a budget. Read that post for ideas that are same same but different.

Transportation. One of the best ways to get around Australian cities is on foot or by public transportation. A lot of the hostels are centrally located meaning that you can either find work within walking distance or able to access it via public transport. Many Australian cities have a combination of bus and train systems in place to help you move around the country. Greyhound goes most places around the country, but Western Australia is served by partner bus lines. Next, the Indian Pacific and the Ghan Railway traverse the continent in an West-East and North-South manner, respectively. By the way, they are consider two the longest train journeys in the world and are considered classics in most over-landers’ books.

Car. If you’re looking to work in more remote areas, either for your second visa or for the money (cause it’s bloody well good out there), then you might want to consider buying a car. They don’t don’t need to be a real schmick make up of a car (meaning, it doesn’t have to be fancy), but it shouldn’t be a gas guzzler either. If you buy a hippiemobile you’ll be able to plug into campsites or simply sleep in the van at night off road or on a farm. You’d have some privacy at least and not have to deal with messy roommates. Bear in mind, however, a hostel dorm bed can cost about $25/night, so if you’re penny pinching, a car might cost you an upfront cost of around $3000 as is (plus registration and insurance) which is the equivalent of 4 months in a hostel dorm. It’s something to consider. If you’re staying city-side, a car might be more of an inconvenience. If you’re planning on venturing outside the city limits on a regular basis (as in, changing cities), then a car might suit you.

Plane tickets. It’s best to buy your tickets to Australia sooner than later. However, if you’re like me and indecisve as ever about all your options, tickets to and from the continent usually top out at $1300 ONE WAY. If you’re in no hurry home, you could always buy a ticket to Bali for a few hundred dollars and then overland it for a month in southeast Asia. Places like Kuala Lumpur and Bangkok often have cheap flights to European destinations (sorry North America, you’re SOL on this one) thanks to low cost carriers such as Air Asia. I often use cheapoair.com or skyscanner.com for my flights.

Money

Bank account. You’ll need a bank account to store all of your hard earned beer money. Australia has a few banks to choose from, the most common one I found was Commonwealth, which also has ATMs in Bali (which is useful if you want to vacation there). There is also ANZ, Citibank, Westpac, St. George’s and then a few others. Most banks and ATMs will accept Cirrus, Maestro Mastercard and Visa cards so you shouldn’t have too much problem finding money to spend, unless you lose your card.

Taxes. As a FOREIGNER you will be taxed heavily, about 30% of your paycheque will go into the government’s pockets. Many people will tell you that you will get this money back. That’s false. It may have been like that a few years ago but now, in order to be taxed at the lowest tax bracket you need to stay in one place for six months, that is, you must become a resident for tax purposes. If you have a job in Sydney for three months, move to Melbourne, work five months and then travel for three months, you’re not a resident for tax purposes and you just lost 30% of your pay to taxes. You need to stay in the same region (ie, Sydney OR Melbourne OR Perth OR out in the sticks) in order to become a resident for tax purposes.

Supertaxrefunds.com.au publishes a few booklets about working and travelling in Australia. Although they offer tax services, have a read through their booklets first to gain a better understanding of the system. Finally, you could use a service such as taxback.com to do you taxes and they’ll keep a percentage of your return.

Or, you could do it yourself. It’s not that hard, add up all of your income (interest, dividends (like you have any as a FOREIGNER), and wages) and then subtract all of your expenses that helped you make that money (your flight to Australia, the visa, some work clothes, food and accommodation before and after you started you job, etc.) I’m no registered tax guy but I can tell you it’s not that difficult. The Australian Taxation Office (ato.com) even publishes a PDF booklet explaining how to do it all.

Jobs. Of course, the loss of tax dollars might not bother you if your wage skyrockets. If you’re working a schmuck hostel job in Sydney but land a mine housekeeping gig, forget the bloody taxes and take the higher paying job. If a farmer wants to employ you for four months to run a tractor and will provide food and accommodation and a vehicle, then maybe the tax return money won’t be as much as if you were to take the new job. I’ve written compiled a lengthy resource list for job seekers in Australia.

Pension. If you’re done with Australia or haven’t somehow managed to snag an Aussie hubby (seriously, it seems the Aussie blokes have more pick of the immigrant population/backpacker group than anybody else) and you need to leave the country, you will get your pension money back. While you might be getting taxed at 30%, your employer is often paying an additional 9% of your wage into your pension fund. When you leave Australia you can claim this money. Again, the government takes its cut (30%) and you get the rest. It’s not much but it is a plane ticket home for most folks. Read more about the Australian pension fund (called superannuation) on the government’s website (http://www.immi.gov.au/allforms/superannuation/).

Living the Life Down Under

Daily life. Your costs will reflect the standard of living you want. If you’re okay bumming around in camping sites and picking fruit, you won’t need very much cash. Neither will you have much savings either. However, stay in the city and you might make more but you’re costs will go up as you buy things like phones and plans, go out on dates, or trekking the mountains.

Phones and staying in touch. One problem with the rising costs of living in Australia is that things like a phone plan will set you back an inordinate amount of money and won’t work all over the country. Telstra is your best bet for rural coverage, then there is Virgin, Optus and a few others that work best in the city. I bought a low end phone that I could use as a modem and just bought a lot of data usage. I ended up spending around $100 a month on phone and data, but your usage might be different.

Health. Australia has a similar health care system to Western Europe and North America. Whether you need medical attention, a gym pass, good footwear or anything else for that matter, Australia has it. Further, marijuana, though illegal, isn’t punishable by death. So, if you’re so concerned about not packing everything you’ll need while in Oz, don’t worry, you can probably buy it there, too. Look out for those dollar stores as they often have those fashionable backpacker shirts and other stereotypical clothing items that will not only make your pictures more authentic, they’re cheap and easy to replace. Further, if you happened to have a close encounter with one of the seven deadliest creatures on the continent, don’t worry since most places have anti-venines available, though maybe not readily.

Overall, Australia isn’t a budget destination, but it does offer adventure, work/money and a way of life that is just a bit different from other Western countries. It’s a good opportunity especially if you’re young and really have nothing holding you in one place. If you do, negotiate!

I hope that helps! Let me know if I can help you out in any other way. 🙂

Resources for the Working Traveller

There are plenty of other resources out there, both in print and online, that will help you in your research before you go and on the road as you’re making your way around the world. Further, with the advent of travel blogs, there is even more information out there than before. In just a few years there has been an explosion of research (re: travel blog writing) completed on budget travel and working around the world.

A final note, just because I list something below doesn’t mean I endorse it.

Travel Guides

The Practical Nomad – Written by a travel agent, this sizeable book assembles a plethora of information about working and travelling abroad. The only problem is that the author relies on his sources to tell him about what could happen instead of having done it himself.

What Color is Your Parachute? – Always good to do some career research before you go, or maybe after you return, just to see how you see yourself and what opportunities are there that you might not have thought of just yet.

Work Your Way Around the World – A thorough resource aimed at the general audience. Full of good resources and updated every few years. Also has a companion Teach ESL Around the World.

Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to Long Term Travel – Not so much a practical guide as it is a philosophical discussion on travelling. Working is done simply to keep the travels going.

Guide BooksLonely Planet, Let’s Go, Frommer’s, Bradt, and a whole lot more. Although these guides are often dated once they are published, they still provide a good offline resource that can also be used in self-defence.

If you’re looking for some inspiration on travelling and writing about it, I highly recommend you check out my post on travelogues.

If they’re not available at your local library, check Amazon. (Affiliate link!)

Websites

Travel blogs are a great way to research a destination before going. Many are first-hand accounts though some, in an effort to fund their own travels, accept sponsored posts which means they receive payment for writing up a local restaurant, hotel or whatever. Many have affiliate links too.

Expats Blog – probably the most comprehensive directory of travel blogs on the net. Organized by country.
The Working Traveller – An excellent resource for those who want to work and travel abroad.
Teaching Travelling – Hosts interviews and other useful tips for those who want to teach abroad.
The Professional Hobo – Contains a helpful series of interviews with travellers both long-term and short-term.
Art of Adventuring – Aimed at the backpacking crowd, a good resource for
Ytravel Blog – For families that want to know what it’s like to travel the world.
Nomadic Matt – Long-term traveller has written a lot about where he has gone and how he made it happen.
Twenty Something Travel – For female travellers.
Transitions Abroad – What started off as a book of resources is now only a website because it’s become just so immense. One of the best sites out there.
Road Junky – A rather cheeky yet matter-of-fact resource for the modern nomad.
Lonely Planet Thorn Tree Forum – A good place to research your hopeful destination from the discussion threads.
SEA Backpacker – specific to the southeast Asian region. Also available in print.
Gum Tree – International job listings, house rentals, used goods for sale, etc.
Dave’s ESL – For those wanting to teach ESL abroad. The forum has posts going back quite a few years already.
Doctors Without Borders – For the medical professionals who want to work abroad either for a stipend or volunteer.

Job Resources

Recruiters will be your friend in securing work since they make it easy to arrange a job before you’re even on the ground. By doing so you’ll have the peace of mind of having a pay cheque within a few weeks of arriving. That doesn’t mean you have to get a job right away, but it pays to know your choices as many of the recruiters will help you get your in-country paper work ready (Tax File Number or Social Insurance, etc.)

Australian Harvest Trail Website – Publishes as annual guide on the types of Australian harvest work available year-round.

The Job Shop – Job placement in Australia, mainly in West Australia.
Kelly Services – Office work and other placements around the world.
Talentcor – Ongoing work, manual and administrative in Canada.
Teach Away, Inc. – Places ESL teachers all over the world.
Footprints – Another ESL teacher-placement service.

Visas

If you decided to go abroad and find work you’re going to need the proper papers or else, technically, you’re working illegally. If that doesn’t bother you then you can skip this section, but beware that some countries require you to have an onward ticket before they let you into the country.

Visa HQ – A good first-stop to check whether or not you need a visa for your target country.
Government Websites – The British, USA, Canadian and Australian websites are pretty thorough in their advisories for travellers. However, most governments host their own site advising their citizens of the dangers abroad.
Wikipedia Working Holiday Visa – Due to the communal nature of this online resource there is a page dedicated to the working holiday visa that is regularly updated.

Transportation

cheapoair.com – online discount airfare and hotel.

skyscanner.com – same same as cheapoair.com, but has more international websites.

greyhound.com – North America’s primary bus operator

megabus.com – cheap bus fare for eastern North America

viarail.ca – Canada’s rail network.

Accommodation

trivago.com – for hotels mostly in North America

airbnb.com – the new way to find cheap, local accommodation

hostelworld.com – dorms, single beds, private rooms in hostels around the world. I use this all the time to at least find the places, though I often don’t book ahead simply because I have a hard time finding some of these places.

hotwire.com – find cheap deals on hotels around the world, but you won’t know where the place is until you make the booking.

Resources for the Working Traveller

There are plenty of other resources out there, both in print and online, that will help you in your research before you go and on the road as you’re making your way around the world. Further, with the advent of travel blogs, there is even more information out there than before. In just a few years there has been an explosion of research (re: travel blog writing) completed on budget travel and working around the world.

A final note, just because I list something below doesn’t mean I endorse it.

Travel Guides

The Practical Nomad – Written by a travel agent, this sizeable book assembles a plethora of information about working and travelling abroad. The only problem is that the author relies on his sources to tell him about what could happen instead of having done it himself.

What Color is Your Parachute? – Always good to do some career research before you go, or maybe after you return, just to see how you see yourself and what opportunities are there that you might not have thought of just yet.

Work Your Way Around the World – A thorough resource aimed at the general audience. Full of good resources and updated every few years. Also has a companion Teach ESL Around the World.

Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to Long Term Travel – Not so much a practical guide as it is a philosophical discussion on travelling. Working is done simply to keep the travels going.

Guide BooksLonely Planet, Let’s Go, Frommer’s, Bradt, and a whole lot more. Although these guides are often dated once they are published, they still provide a good offline resource that can also be used in self-defence.

If you’re looking for some inspiration on travelling and writing about it, I highly recommend you check out my post on travelogues.

If they’re not available at your local library, check Amazon. (Affiliate link!)

Websites

Travel blogs are a great way to research a destination before going. Many are first-hand accounts though some, in an effort to fund their own travels, accept sponsored posts which means they receive payment for writing up a local restaurant, hotel or whatever. Many have affiliate links too.

Expats Blog – probably the most comprehensive directory of travel blogs on the net. Organized by country.
The Working Traveller – An excellent resource for those who want to work and travel abroad.
Teaching Travelling – Hosts interviews and other useful tips for those who want to teach abroad.
The Professional Hobo – Contains a helpful series of interviews with travellers both long-term and short-term.
Art of Adventuring – Aimed at the backpacking crowd, a good resource for
Ytravel Blog – For families that want to know what it’s like to travel the world.
Nomadic Matt – Long-term traveller has written a lot about where he has gone and how he made it happen.
Twenty Something Travel – For female travellers.
Transitions Abroad – What started off as a book of resources is now only a website because it’s become just so immense. One of the best sites out there.
Road Junky – A rather cheeky yet matter-of-fact resource for the modern nomad.
Lonely Planet Thorn Tree Forum – A good place to research your hopeful destination from the discussion threads.
SEA Backpacker – specific to the southeast Asian region. Also available in print.
Gum Tree – International job listings, house rentals, used goods for sale, etc.
Dave’s ESL – For those wanting to teach ESL abroad. The forum has posts going back quite a few years already.
Doctors Without Borders – For the medical professionals who want to work abroad either for a stipend or volunteer.

Job Resources

Recruiters will be your friend in securing work since they make it easy to arrange a job before you’re even on the ground. By doing so you’ll have the peace of mind of having a pay cheque within a few weeks of arriving. That doesn’t mean you have to get a job right away, but it pays to know your choices as many of the recruiters will help you get your in-country paper work ready (Tax File Number or Social Insurance, etc.)

Australian Harvest Trail Website – Publishes as annual guide on the types of Australian harvest work available year-round.

The Job Shop – Job placement in Australia, mainly in West Australia.
Kelly Services – Office work and other placements around the world.
Talentcor – Ongoing work, manual and administrative in Canada.
Teach Away, Inc. – Places ESL teachers all over the world.
Footprints – Another ESL teacher-placement service.

Visas

If you decided to go abroad and find work you’re going to need the proper papers or else, technically, you’re working illegally. If that doesn’t bother you then you can skip this section, but beware that some countries require you to have an onward ticket before they let you into the country.

Visa HQ – A good first-stop to check whether or not you need a visa for your target country.
Government Websites – The British, USA, Canadian and Australian websites are pretty thorough in their advisories for travellers. However, most governments host their own site advising their citizens of the dangers abroad.
Wikipedia Working Holiday Visa – Due to the communal nature of this online resource there is a page dedicated to the working holiday visa that is regularly updated.

On Writing

Writing, at its core, is my lifeblood. I can’t imagine doing anything else that doesn’t lead to having something to write about. Working, travelling, investing, music, movies, books and conversations is all fodder for writing. Writing, in essence, helps me think. As one of my friends is fond of saying, “It’s all about the biography.” Writing plays a large part in my life and, not surprisingly, adds to my biography. It’s never been easier to put pen to paper and simply begin writing, or fingers to the keyboard and start posting. The challenge, as usual, is to give yourself permission, and by that I mean, the time and confidence to do so.

To get motivated to write, I have a few methods to get things going:

  1. Timer. Sometimes I won’t take my power cord so my laptop’s battery acts as a timer of sorts. This is a double-edged sword because if the inspiration does strike and my battery is running out then obviously I need to stop and go get my power cord, which may disrupt the flow. In any event, having a set time to work helps me focus.
  2. Location. Although I can write at home, I find I write better at cafes because simply the act of going to the cafe is like going to work. Further, I enjoy the distractions of the cafe chatter and, of course, other people. Cafes are the some of the most affordable office in the world. The $2.50 is worth it for the coffee, WIFI connection, power outlet (if needed), washroom facilities, relative safety of my stuff, the choice of sweets (extra charge), and a chair and table to myself. That being the case, I sometimes write at home in the comfort of my bed.
  3. Schedule. Since I work and travel a lot, there are times when I’m working a day job and others when I have a lot of free time. On my days off, however, the morning is spent writing while the afternoon is spent reading and researching, evening is for movies, drinking and conversation, all of which I find important to generating ideas. When I’m not working, I aim to get out of the house/hostel/whatever by 9:30 or 10 so I can write as much as I can before lunch. Sometimes I’ll eat at the cafe but, depending on how much I’m getting done, I find it helpful to get up and walk to some other place. All of that leads up to two to two and a half hours of writing and I’m very protective of these hours. While in South Korea teaching English with work beginning at 8:30 in the morning and going until 4:30, I got up at 6 am (okay, most weekday mornings since on the weekends I’d go out partying) and did my best to crank out 1000 words before work. Similarly, while travelling through SE Asia and I wanted to write my first movie script, I sat down every morning (much to the dismay of my travelling companion) to crank out another couple hundred words before we went out for the day’s sight-seeing.
  4. Word Target. In addition to my schedule and “timer”, I keep up my writing motivation by keeping track of my daily word count. That is, on a separate spreadsheet I track how many words I write per day I sit down to write. I aim for 2000 words per writing day. Sometimes I make it, other days I don’t. Either way, it’s a good goal to have and helps me track my progress.
  5. Music. I listen to a variety of genres to keep me interested. Metal, jazz, classical, hip hop, Kpop, you name it, I’ll listen to it if it spurs some sort of creative juice.
  6. Inspiration. If I find I’m not writing very much it’s usually because my “creative well” has dried up. There could be any number of reasons for this, ranging from a need to change up the routine to simply not reading other material or, something I’m really guilt of, not meeting or talking with other people. To remedy that I’ll head to the library, the cheapest and easiest book store in the world. I’ll pick out a few titles from any number of sections and flip through them to see what I can find. I tend toward history and non-fiction, but sometimes I’ll pick up a work of fiction or two.
  7. Stimulants. Caffeine is probably the only thing I use on a regular basis to help my writing. I rarely use alcohol to stimulate my writing. In fact, I often restrict drinking to the evening hours when I want to slow down my thinking process. There is a common myth that the best writing gets done while on drugs, drunk, broken hearted or otherwise in a depressive state or in a bad mood. I’ve found it quite the opposite. If things aren’t going well for me in my day-to-day life, I’ve found my writing suffers as a result. I find it much easier to write when my day-to-day life is in order. That is, I have money in my pocket (whether from savings or gainfully employed), coffee (not tea or instant), not broken hearted (relationships are, to me, usually a distraction from writing), and being drunk has rarely served my writing purpose. Drugs have never done anything directly beneficial for my writing. All in all, my writing hours are best served by a clear head, a good night’s sleep, and a cup of good, strong coffee. Things may be different for you so see what works, but understand that seeking “inspiration” from drugs, drinking and fucking around isn’t the best way to go about becoming a better writer.

This schedule, of course, gets modified according to whatever job I’m doing to sustain my travels. Working on a farm, for instance, often requires getting up early and working late so it’s not always easy to find the time, or the energy, to write every day. If you’re lucky enough to get a job driving a GPS-guided tractor it is possible to type up some notes on your smart phone provided you watch out for telephone poles, trees and remember to turn at the end of the run.

Finally, I’ve found this method of working transferable. Whatever your speciality is, be it music, film, writing, or anything else, there is a certain amount you’ll have to do every day in order to begin seeing the results you envision. It’s not easy but it can be done and the more often you do it, the easier it becomes and the better you get.

The Drawbacks of Long-Term Travel

I’ve heard it a few times recently that my life sounds exciting, and it is, but I feel as if I should clarify a few things about long term travel. Whether you’ve followed my travels for a short time or a long time, since 2008 I’ve been working and travelling around the world. In this post I want to point out a few of the drawbacks of long term travel.

First, money is a challenge, but I realize this is my own doing. Do I find another job or do I take that trip? Is it possible to combine both at the same time? Up until the age of 26 I was gainfully employed in a number of jobs. I remember writing out my resume and my potential employer couldn’t believe what she saw. They still don’t.

Things changed in 2008 and that’s when I decided it was “now or never,” and thus began working and travelling around the world.

I was right to leave Canada and begin working around the world, both as an ESL teacher and a farm hand. What I would do differently, however, and what I would caution others is to do, is take care of my finances a little better. Either have a job or another source of income; potential jobs or incomes don’t count. Despite the oft repeated phrase “money isn’t everything,” it sure helps when you want to fly across the world. In that case, it might not be everything, but it really, really helps.

All of that being said and done, the main thing I would’ve done differently to prevent financial trouble is simply get a job to bring in a paycheque, even if the job isn’t something I’d really want to do.

And that leads me to a very interesting point: to date I’ve worked on four continents doing two different jobs. My first job was teaching ESL (South Korea, Ukraine, Cambodia), the second was working as a farm hand (Canada and Australia). I do not care to be a teacher and never even thought about becoming a farmer but those jobs have two things in common: they are plentiful and pay well. I’ve recently added a third and forth, that of stacking boxes/warehouse work (Canada) and writing (Canada, again). In any event, the one thing that I now find most challenging is going through yet another interview for yet another job in yet another country. Don’t be fooled that this gets any easier. Working “odd jobs” loses its lustre after the first few times. After that it becomes tedious and you begin to question your career choices.

So why do I do all of this? What motivates me?

There are several things that motivate me but I’ll have to elaborate on them in another post. For the time being I’ll refer to Paul Theroux who wrote that the best time to reflect on a trip is about three weeks after you’ve returned. Simply put, accomplishments motivate me. I’m happy to say I’ve successfully worked on four continents. I’ve recorded and released five albums with my Canadian music projects while recording and (hopefully soon) releasing my own jazz album that I made while in Malaysia. I’ve also kept a blog of my travels which helps remind me of what I’ve done and where I’ve been. I’ve noticed a lul in my writing as of late since my travel life has simply become my normal life. I almost feel it’s necessary to begin writing about things many people take for granted, such as careers, money, relationships.

Ah, relationships. That’s one of the other drawbacks of long-term travel. I recently asked a co-worker what would motivate him to move across the world if he was given the chance.

Money and family.

It’s true. I’ve returned to Canada a few times for no other time than to simply visit my family. During this time I’m often asked if I’m back to stay and have to smile my way through the “you have no direction in your life” conversation. I suppose it’s true, but I’ve always figured as long as I write I have some sort of career going on, regardless of how much it brings in.

I have noticed, however, that the decisions I made based on the potential profit I would earn have always ended somewhat dismally. Throughout most of my travels money has simply been a means to more travel, stories motivate me more than simply money. Although I will be the first to proclaim the benefits of having money versus not having money, I can’t help but find money kinda boring. It doesn’t do much on its own. But it does enable you to do other things, from opening a savings account to travelling across the world.

The last thing about relationships is, of course, about girlfriends. I don’t particularly care to discuss my private life very much but those who are interested in long-term travel should understand that it isn’t easy to keep a relationship going, especially when the urge to move hits you again. I think my longest relationship in the last five years was three months. Why didn’t they work out? Usually because one of us wanted to move on to another place while the either didn’t want to or couldn’t for some reason. As often as I’ve left someone, I’ve been left behind, too.

So if money, family and stories motivate you to move, what is the “bigger picture” you’re painting? In other words, what is your career?

I had an interesting conversation with my father the other day about how he never wanted to be a writer, he wanted to be a farmer. As things came to pass, his brother took over the farm and my Dad moved to the city to find employment as a writer about agriculture. I’ve always wanted to be a writer, not a teacher or a farmer, but those jobs offered a great opportunity to write about what went on. In other words, they offered a good story to write about. It became inevitable that I worked and travelled. Basically, one of the motivating factors in my search for employment, other than money, is a good story. I think this is where a lot of people think my life is exciting, and it is.

Like everything else, however, there are lulls, dips, ebbs and flows to long term travel. I do not want to travel the world forever. There are only so many temples, churches, mountains, trails, and languages you can care to see, hear, learn or experience before you simply want some sort of non-chaotic constant in your life. That is to say, some sort of settlement.

With that, I look at what a lot of my friends and family are doing (getting married, setting up careers, having babies, buying houses) and I don’t feel jealous one bit. I’m happy for them and even admire them. It’s amazing that they can do those things! Are those things for me right now? No, I don’t think so. With the money I would put towards those things, I could use to travel to the places I still want to see. In other words, I’m not ready to settle down but, I also know that I won’t always travel as I do now. When will it stop? Will it be because of money and/or family? I simply don’t know. Until I know, my journey continues.

So what would I tell anybody who wants to travel the world?

A few things:

  • Go! You’ll be happier that you did it than wondering “coulda woulda shoulda”.
  • Take care to generate cash flow through a job or an income. If there’s one thing I’ve found it’s that working in a different country offers a completely different experience from simply visiting it.
  • Check your ego at the door, which means, be humble and be willing to “have a go” at just about anything.
  • Keep a journal or blog.
  • Take lots of pictures and videos.

I hope that’s clarified a little bit of the “excitement” and “mystery” of my life as a working traveller. Yes, it is a very exciting life, especially when I think back to all the places I’ve been and the stories I have. But there are moments when I, too, question what I’m doing. As far as I know, that’s a pretty normal thing to do, it means you don’t have all the answers and your journey continues. If you have any more questions or concerns, please get in touch with my through email at stevensirski [at] gmail [dot] com.