Category Archives: Music

Featuring not only my music but CD and show reviews from around the world.

Resources for Musicians

Whether you’re an aspiring musician or a full-on professional, these are some of the resources I’ve found useful throughout my years as a drummer and musician.

Video
Whether you simply want to get your work out there or you want to stream your work (and possibly collect ad revenue), internet video sites are the new cable channels.
YouTube – YouTube is the second largest search engine in the world after Google. Watch and learn with the myriad of “how to’s” and other instructional videos.
Vimeo – Less ads than YouTube and a place for the creative types to share their work.

Online Music
In addition to YouTube and Vimeo above, these sites offer music-hosting only, though they often include “Buy” links or enable users to download your music (if you allow them to).
Soundcloud – Free hosting for your songs.
Amazon – You can buy just about anything from this online retailer.
iTunes – Buy and sell mp3s through their web store.
Last.fm – Online music streaming available worldwide (unlike pandora.com).
MySpace – One of the first online music-streaming services out there. Has been eclipsed by more recent offerings such as Soundcloud.

Sound Editing
Audacity – Free and open source recording and editing software.
Garageband – Apple’s consumer-level recording studio. Bundled with every Mac.
Logic – Apple’s more professional recording software. Lots of folks have recommended this one to me.
Kompoz – A neat site that gathers musicians from around the world over the internet. Although you can record with whatever you want, Kompoz requires you to install its own proprietary software to collaborate.

Making Money
It’s part of the business. Many of the resources in this post offer free or premium services. Those premium services are your friend because they help pay the bills. Whether it’s royalties, downloads, books, instructional videos or whatever, the following programs may help you generate more income streams.
Scribd – Offer your written work for free or a fee. Easy to use for everybody involved.
Amazon Affiliates – Largest online retailer has an affiliates program where you earn a commission on each product sold through your link.
Google Adsense – Love em or hate em, ads pay for a lot of the “free” stuff we consume.
WordPress.com – You’re not just a musician any more. Get a blog and advertise your work. Free or premium.
Bandcamp – Offer your songs for free or on a pay-what-you-want deal.
CD Baby – Music distribution service, both digital and hard copy.
Tunecore – Another music distribution service.
eJunkie – Site dedicated to distributing digital content. Books, CDs, etc.
Createspace – Print-on-demand books, CDs and DVDs. Run by Amazon.

Storage
Backing up your work is a good idea. Don’t let those ideas get lost in the digital void. There are several cloud-storage companies out there, including Amazon, but Dropbox and Box can synch right to your home computer, tablet or other device. They both offer free and paid services.
Dropbox – Probably one of the easiest cloud-storage programs to use.
Box – Another cloud-storage program.

Magazines
Admittedly this is skewed towards drummers because I am one. There are lots of resources out there for the aspiring and professional musician. These are just a few that I use.
Modern Drummer – World’s best selling drum magazine.
Drum! – A little more cheeky than Modern Drummer
Rhythm – The UK’s drum magazine of choice. Part of a larger network of music publications.
Musician Wages – Great online resource for those who want to learn more about the working life of a musician.
Music Think Tank – Not sure who runs this but sometimes there are some good articles on it.

Happy Ukrainian New Year!

Alright, so January 14th – ish is the New Year celebration for what I’ve known as “Ukrainian New Year’s”. The date, of course, is according to the Gregorian Calendar calendar, which is given to us thanks to Pope Gregory XIII way back in 1582.

Anyway, as kids growing up in the Ukrainian tradition, we’d visit the households of people we knew (usually grandparents, aunts and uncles) and some people we kids didn’t know (but our parents did) and sing a traditional Ukrainian New Year’s carol. It took some searching, but I was able to find the full song thanks to a friendly Ukrainian blogger. Here it is:

Сію, сію, посіваю.
З Новим роком вас вітаю.
Щоб сей рік було більше, ніж торік.[2]

На щастя, на здоров’я, на Новий рік!
Щоб уродило краще, ніж торік!
Коноплі під стелю, а льон по коліна,
Щоб у вас, хрещених, голова не боліла!

Сійся, родися жито-пшениця, всяка пашениця,
на новий рік, щоб краще родило як торік,
Коноплі під стелю, а льон по коліна,
Щоб у вас хрещених головка не боліла.
будьте здорові з Новим роком.

Сію, сію, засіваю,
Вашу хату не минаю,
З Новим роком йду до хати,
Щось вам маю віншувати:
Щоб діти всі здорові,
Їли кашу всі готові,
Щоб вам була з них потіха.
А нам грошей із пів міха!

А в полі-полі

Сам Господь ходив.
І Мати Божа ризи носила,
Ризи носила, Бога просила:
Уроди Боже жито-пшеницю,
Жито-пшеницю, усяку пашницю.
На щастя, на здоров’я, на Новий рік!

For those of you who don’t know Ukrainian (even mine’s a bit rusty) or simply too lazy to pop that into your local online translator, the song basically wishes the household a prosperous new year with abundant crops, good health, wealth and prosperity for all. As kids we’d go carolling with little shakers filled with wheat. And since we lived in the city (and the land was covered in snow), we’d pretend to sprinkle the house with wheat while singing the opening few lines, which basically mean “sowing sowing, what is sown, happy new year, that this year is better than last year.”

One last note, we actually didn’t celebrate Ukrainian New Year’s when we were growing up, opting instead to do our rounds on January 1st. I was always kind of jealous of the kids who took off from school both Ukrainian Christmas (January 7th) and New Year’s (January 14th) . Oh well.

Happy Ukrainian New Year!

Alright, so January 14th – ish is the New Year celebration for what I’ve known as “Ukrainian New Year’s”. The date, of course, is according to the Gregorian Calendar calendar, which is given to us thanks to Pope Gregory XIII way back in 1582.

Anyway, as kids growing up in the Ukrainian tradition, we’d visit the households of people we knew (usually grandparents, aunts and uncles) and some people we kids didn’t know (but our parents did) and sing a traditional Ukrainian New Year’s carol. It took some searching, but I was able to find the full song thanks to a friendly Ukrainian blogger. Here it is:

Сію, сію, посіваю.
З Новим роком вас вітаю.
Щоб сей рік було більше, ніж торік.[2]

На щастя, на здоров’я, на Новий рік!
Щоб уродило краще, ніж торік!
Коноплі під стелю, а льон по коліна,
Щоб у вас, хрещених, голова не боліла!

Сійся, родися жито-пшениця, всяка пашениця,
на новий рік, щоб краще родило як торік,
Коноплі під стелю, а льон по коліна,
Щоб у вас хрещених головка не боліла.
будьте здорові з Новим роком.

Сію, сію, засіваю,
Вашу хату не минаю,
З Новим роком йду до хати,
Щось вам маю віншувати:
Щоб діти всі здорові,
Їли кашу всі готові,
Щоб вам була з них потіха.
А нам грошей із пів міха!

А в полі-полі

Сам Господь ходив.
І Мати Божа ризи носила,
Ризи носила, Бога просила:
Уроди Боже жито-пшеницю,
Жито-пшеницю, усяку пашницю.
На щастя, на здоров’я, на Новий рік!

For those of you who don’t know Ukrainian (even mine’s a bit rusty) or simply too lazy to pop that into your local online translator, the song basically wishes the household a prosperous new year with abundant crops, good health, wealth and prosperity for all. As kids we’d go carolling with little shakers filled with wheat. And since we lived in the city (and the land was covered in snow), we’d pretend to sprinkle the house with wheat while singing the opening few lines, which basically mean “sowing sowing, what is sown, happy new year, that this year is better than last year.”

One last note, we actually didn’t celebrate Ukrainian New Year’s when we were growing up, opting instead to do our rounds on January 1st. I was always kind of jealous of the kids who took off from school both Ukrainian Christmas (January 7th) and New Year’s (January 14th) . Oh well.

International Music

Below you’ll find a few posts about the international music I’ve collected and enjoyed while travelling abroad.

If you’re interested in the music I’ve made, please visit this page.

Asian Rock and Metal
Korean Rock Music
Korean Traditional, Pop, and Jazz Music
Country Music Radio
Winnipeg Music
Polish Rock and Metal Muzyka
Polish Reggae, Jazz, Traditional and Classical Muzyka
Modern Ukrainian Music
Australian Music Festivals
Religious Music and Dance From My Travels
Street Performers
Chinese Lion Dance

International Music

Below you’ll find a few posts about the international music I’ve collected and enjoyed while travelling abroad.

If you’re interested in the music I’ve made, please visit this page.

Asian Rock and Metal
Korean Rock Music
Korean Traditional, Pop, and Jazz Music
Country Music Radio
Winnipeg Music
Polish Rock and Metal Muzyka
Polish Reggae, Jazz, Traditional and Classical Muzyka
Modern Ukrainian Music
Australian Music Festivals
Religious Music and Dance From My Travels
Street Performers
Chinese Lion Dance